Millers Day Centre

Carers and Health Care Professionals benefit from My Health Guide.

It’s not just service users that are deriving benefits from the recently launched digital health app My Health Guide, targeted at adults with learning disabilities.

This app allows users to communicate far more effectively with carers, parents, guardians and health professionals using a very simple format involving the easy uploading of images and videos that reflect a user’s life experiences and health requirements.

Carers and healthcare professionals are also benefiting with better levels of communication and more efficient administration from a digital platform that was developed by London-based software developers Maldaba Ltd and is currently being trialled by the Humber NHS Foundation Trust.

Sarah Hockley, a carer at Millers Day Centre in Beverley, sums it up perfectly:
“One of the biggest issues when it comes to working with adults with learning disabilities is communication. It can be difficult at times to understand what messages are being conveyed due to their level of language skills.

“This app allows users to communicate far more effectively with carers, parents, guardians and health professionals using a very simple format involving the easy uploading of images and videos that reflect a user’s life experiences and health requirements.

“Up until now we tended to keep paper diaries for service users that needed constant updating and revising. With My Health Guide it’s all in one place. Carers and health professionals can find out everything they need to know about someone’s care requirements.

“Support plans for each service user become redundant as needs change but that can all be recorded easily on My Health Guide. It’s a really good idea and the possibilities are endless,” added Sarah who has been closely involved in the development of the app together with other staff and users at Millers Day Centre.

My Health Guide ticks a lot of the boxes in terms of reducing the day to day challenges of working with adults with learning disabilities.

Another carer at Millers, Haley, is a big fan of the functionality and flexibility: “It’s so easy to put in content and then change it or delete it as you see fit. Even mums and dads would be able to do it!

“The people we work with generally have a limited vocabulary and poor language skills but they can show us what they are trying to say by using the images and videos. A picture says a thousand words!

“It also improves the social interaction and engagement of service users as it means they can show us what they’ve been up to,” added Haley.

The My Health Guide’ app that was inspired by the heart-warming story of “Matthew’s Book”, an iPad-based, multi-media guide that accompanies Hull-based Matthew Prosser wherever he goes. Matthew has profound and complex needs and his book allows carers and healthcare professionals to understand essential aspects of his care and what good practice means for him.

The final word belongs to Sarah: “Anything that makes life less stressful is good by me. My Health Guide ticks a lot of the boxes in terms of reducing the day to day challenges of working with adults with learning disabilities.”

Watch Sarah, Haley and service users themselves talk about My Health Guide in this video: